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This page is dedicated to Roy Halladay’s historic Postseason no-hitter in Game 1 of the NLDS against the Reds. It was the second no-hitter in Postseason history, and Doc’s second no-hitter of 2010. It was this game that jumpstarted the Phillies’ sweep of the Reds in the NLDS. Congratulations to Doc on this memorable and historic feat. Featured below is the game recap post from that night’s game, and pictures from the game. 

 Red DOCtober: Doc No-Hits Reds in First Playoff Start

AP Photo/Matt Slocum 

AP Photo/Matt Slocum

Roy Halladay had waited 11 years to make a Postseason start, and no matter what, it would be memorable to him. All that mattered was that he helped his team win. Except, it isn’t going to be memorable for Doc; it’s memorable for the entire city of Philadelphia, and all of baseball. That’s because after all the talk of a mighty Reds’ offense, they had no hits to show for their first playoff game in 15 years. And Roy Halladay had another no-hitter, to go along with his perfect game. 

Perhaps the most important thing was to provide Doc with comfort, no matter how on his game he was. The Phillies did that in the first. Shane Victorino doubled and stole third with Chase Utley at the plate. Utley brought him home with a sac fly, and the Phillies had the early lead. The next inning, a walk issued to Carlos Ruiz sent the Reds into a whirlwind of an inning. Wilson Valdez reached on an infield single, and the Reds had to feel comfortable with Halladay at the plate. But, just because he gets the outs easy, doesn’t mean he’s an easy out. Doc ripped the first pitch he saw into left field, and Ruiz scored. Two batters later, Shane Victorino struck again, as he dropped a single into centerfield, plating two more runs, and giving the Phillies a 4-0 lead. That chased Reds’ starter Edinson Volquez from the game, but the Reds’ bullpen held the Phils in check for the rest of the game. But, Halladay just kept dealing, and into the fifth, not one Reds’ hitter had reached base. It wasn’t until there were two outs in the fifth, that Jay Bruce worked a walk off Doc, ending the bid for the perfect game. In that regard, Don Larsen was safe. But, as the game reached critical points, the excitement grew, and the thought that history could actually be made became a reality. Quickly, the seventh and eighth were over, and that zero still showed the drama of the situation. Again, working quickly, Doc put away the first two without much of a fight. The only Red left in his way was Brandon Phillips. Ahead 0-2, Doc needed one strike, and the resulting play brought out a range of emotions. Phillips dribbled one out in front of the plate. The ball rolled slowly, and even caught part of the bat as it rolled in away from Chooch. Halladay peeled off; it was Chooch’s play. With quick instincts, Ruiz fired to first, and got Phillips by plenty. Roy Halladay had done it again, firing another no-hitter, and the Phillies took the 1-0 advantage in the series with a 4-0 Game 1 win.   

Photo by Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images Photo by Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images

Just hours before the final out, and before Halladay’s first Postseason pitch, Cliff Lee had finished off another stellar performance. And on another day, the city of Philadelphia would begin talking about what might have been. But, taking the mound in Philly was Roy Halladay, Ruben Amaro Jr’s prize from the Lee trade. If anybody doesn’t think this was a good trade, what else do you want Doc to do? In his first season as a Phillie, he’s pitched a perfect game, just the 20th in Major League history, thrown a Postseason no-hitter, just the second in Major League history, and he’s been a Cy Young pitcher. He is simply amazing, and in a day when pitching is more and more of a lost art, Halladay shines as bright as any of the stars from the past. Halladay dazzled in his Postseason debut, in the only way Roy Halladay can, by striking out eight Reds, and facing one batter over the minimum, his only walk going to Jay Bruce. Halladay isn’t the only story, as Shane Victorino joined Phillies’ lore in a special way as well. He had a pair of hits, but his first made the Phillies’ all-time leader in Postseason hits, passing Mike Schmidt. But, again, the story is Roy Halladay, who made his last start count in the NL East clincher, and came up two hits shorts of the feat celebrated tonight. Many said aside from his perfect game, that was Doc’s best pitched game all season. Well, this one has to rank right at the top, because with the playoffs starting, Doc simply looked for a way to win, but along the way, he made a little history as well. 

The Phillies continue their NLDS matchup with the Reds on Friday. Coming soon to Phillies Network will be a preview on Game 2 Friday Morning. 

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Kevin Durso is a writer for Phillies Network. In addition to his work on Phillies Network, Kevin writes for Philliedelphia, Flyerdelphia and Eagledelphia. You can follow him on twitter @KDursoPhilsNet. Also check out Phillies Network's page on Facebook or @PhilliesNetwork on twitter for new posts and updates.