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This highlights the history that took place on May 29, 2010. That night, Roy Halladay became the second Phillies’ pitcher, and 20th pitcher in Major League history, to fire a perfect game. This page commemorates this remarkable feat. Below are several pictures from that night, as well as the post that followed. Congrats to Doc for making history!

Grilled to Perfection: Doc Deals MLB’s 20th Perfect Game

AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee

AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee 

On Mother’s Day, and ever since, Dallas Braden was the talk of Major League Baseball. After a perfect game, why wouldn’t you be? Tonight, Roy Halladay became the talk of Major League Baseball, and Philadelphia’s hero, by being as perfect as ever. The rarest feat in baseball, only accomplished 19 times before, was completed in South Florida. Roy Halladay finished off baseball’s 20th perfect game, and slated himself as the focal point of one of the greatest moments in Phillies’ history.

The Phillies handed the ball to Doc to extend their winning streak, but it was a losing streak Doc was out to end. He had lost his last two starts, and his record had slipped to 6-3. Doc dealed from the beginning, and retired the Marlins through two without a threat, or a baserunner. The Phillies gave him the lead in the third on a weird play. Chase Utley lined a ball to center, which seemed to be an easy play for Cameron Maybin. But Maybin misjudged the ball, and it deflected off his glove past him into centerfield, allowing Wilson Valdez to score. It was the only run the Phillies would score off Marlins’ ace Josh Johnson. It was also the only run Doc would need. Doc worked through the game with the same dominance we had seen all year, and was all business. Into the eighth inning, he had yet to allow a baserunner. Leading off the eighth was Jorge Cantu, who sharply rolled a pitch toward third. Filling in for an injured Placido Polanco was Juan Castro, who stabbed it and was able to get Cantu just in time with the throw. Two easy outs later, and Doc was three outs away from history. Into the ninth, Doc was riding more than just a historical victory; he was holding a slim 1-0 lead. Doc retired Mike Lamb on a fly ball to deep center. Next was former Phillie Wes Helms, who struck out looking. Four pitches to Ronny Paulino finished off a perfect night in Florida, as he chopped one to Castro. A perfect throw to first sealed it and Roy Halladay was the 20th pitcher in baseball, who could call himself perfect. The Phillies added to their winning streak with the 1-0 win, but tonight is all about Doc.

There are only so many words to describe the type of outing Roy Halladay turned in tonight. But only one, perfect, completely sums up the night, and marks his place in the history books. When people say someone was perfect, especially a pitcher, you can instantly think of the rare occasion where not one single batter in a game reaches base. It was going to be hard to find anything more impressive than Jamie Moyer’s two-hit shutout on May 7th. After all, he became the oldest pitcher to throw a shutout that night, and it was as dominant a performance we had seen all year. But tonight, Roy Halladay became one of the Phillies’ greats. The only other pitcher on this team with a perfect game was Jim Bunning, who did it Father’s Day in 1964. Doc’s perfection gives the Phillies two pitchers with the feat, only the fifth team in baseball with that claim. He’s the third pitcher to throw a perfect game in his first year with a new team. Pairing him with Dallas Braden, who reached perfection 20 days earlier, marks only the second year in baseball where two pitchers were perfect. The last: 1880. The Phillies weren’t even in existance at that time. Halladay was answering the call of so many tonight as well. If pitch count was an issue, he took care of it tonight, working through 27 Marlins in 115 pitches, 72 for strikes. He retired 11 on strikeouts as well. 6 of them were Marlins caught looking. If you ask around the Major Leagues, many will tell you the guy who hadn’t thrown a no-hitter or perfect game, but expected to be able to do so, was Roy Halladay. Doc even flirted with a no-no once earlier in his career, a game against the Detroit Tigers, just the second one of his career. After 8.2 innings, he had yet to allow a hit. Bobby Higginson was the only one who stood in his way. Higginson homered, snapping the bid, and it has eluded Halladay ever since. That is until tonight, the night when the guy who always seems to look perfect, be perfect, and pitch perfect; actually was perfect.

The Phillies ride the emotional excitement from tonight’s win into tomorrow, where they look to complete the sweep of the Marlins. Jamie Moyer (5-4, 4.55 ERA) takes the mound against Anibal Sanchez (4-2, 3.23 ERA).

                                                APTOPIX Phillies Marlins Baseball

Phillies Marlins Baseball 

Phillies Marlins Baseball

Phillies Marlins Baseball

All Photos Courtesy of AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee

 

 

 

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Kevin Durso is a writer for Phillies Network. In addition to his work on Phillies Network, Kevin writes for Philliedelphia, Flyerdelphia and Eagledelphia. You can follow him on twitter @KDursoPhilsNet. Also check out Phillies Network's page on Facebook or @PhilliesNetwork on twitter for new posts and updates.